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Monthly Archives: August 2017

Late Bloom Arts Festival in Canary Wharf – 10th to 13th August 2017

Over the Summer months, the public spaces around Canary Wharf come to life with a large number of events. One event that provides a platform for local artists is the Late Bloom Arts Festival which returns to the Crossrail Place Roof Garden performance space.

The festival is a weekend of family fun and performances by artists featuring theatre, dance, music and spoken word.

All the family-friendly performances are free to attend.

Programme

10th August

7pm – Sunday Jazz Assembly: Enjoy toe tapping tunes from crowd pleasers like Girl from Ipanema and Why Don’t You Do Right to forgotten classics like Cherokee

11th August

6.30pm – Band for Life: Come experience music therapy with Band for Life, an innovative project based on the therapeutic effects of music run by Tower Hamlets Methodist circuit

7.30pm – Urban Interface Dance: Hip-hop and theatre combined through Urban Interface Dance

7.40pm – Jessica Mance & Samantha Flemming: Of Seagulls and Men – A vibrant and tongue-in-cheek parody of Homer’s Iliad in which the men battle a family of seagulls for control of a seaside town

8pm – Swati Seshdarig: Bharathanatyam, classical South Indian dance – The performance takes the audience on a resplendent journey through the wonders of Indian culture

12th August

1.45pm – Piedad Seiquer: Ellas, a solo dance performance, is a work in progress investigating the figure of a woman. It’s not only the story of one woman but many women

2pm – Blooming Ludus: Salt & Vinegar DIY Summer Extravaganza – Light-hearted and just a bit cheeky, the song repertoire of Salt & Vinegar follows these fun-loving fish as they attempt to navigate the changing world around them

2.30pm – Jessica Mance & Samantha Flemming: Of Seagulls and Men – A vibrant and tongue-in-cheek parody of Homer’s Iliad in which the men battle a family of seagulls for control of a seaside town

3pm – Tango E14: Performance and workshop

4pm – Piedad Seiquer: Ellas, a solo dance performance, is a work in progress investigating the figure of a woman. It’s not only the story of one woman but many women

5pm – Un:Hurd: Live musical showcase involving local artists from East and Central London, each performing 4 of their own original tracks

13th August

10am – And So My Garden Grows: A family workshop – Cast your eye on the strawberry trees, ferns and other plants brought on ships to London’s Docklands from faraway lands then, create your own mini garden with real seeds that will sprout and grow

12.30pm – Nylah: I use my songs to move and inspire people with words and melodies that are uplifting. I make positive music for people to enjoy and relate to

1.15pm – Genio: People are people; a song about being one among all. We all are together in our world, no matter colours and creed etc

1.45pm – Piedad Seiquer: Ellas, a solo dance performance, is a work in progress investigating the figure of a woman. It’s not only the story of one woman but many women

2.15pm – RedBeard: Human beatboxer with more than five years professional performance experience

3pm – Grace Mason: Grace will be performing a range of songs

4pm – Piedad Seiquer: Ellas, a solo dance performance, is a work in progress investigating the figure of a woman. It’s not only the story of one woman but many women.

Other events to  look out for are a fun packed photography workshop on the 11th August and the Canary Wharf Jazz Festival on the 19th and 20th August 2017

 

 

 

 

 

 

Remembering Wharf Road and St John’s Church

College View on Wharf Road

Regular readers will know that Eric Pemberton often sends photographs and postcards which often illustrate little known aspects of the Island. Recently he sent an interesting photograph of College View and a postcard of the interior of St John’s Church which was damaged by bombs in the Second World War and eventually demolished in the 1950s.

Wharf Road in the 1860s with College view  ( inset Island Gardens after 1937 )

College View was on Wharf Road which had been a feature on the Island from the 1850s, there was little housebuilding in this area till the 1860s when the small amount of development was quickly bought to a standstill by the depression on the Island due to financial problems of many of the shipbuilding yards. Wharf Road ran parallel with Manchester road from Ferry Street to near Pier Street.

Wharf Road 1880s with Station built.

Just off Wharf Road, three cross streets were formed: Barque Street, Ship (later Schooner) Street, and Brig Street.

In the 1880s,two rows of two storey houses with basements were put up in Wharf Road. These were No. 5–8 Wharf Road and No. 1–10 College Row were built. By this time, some of the area near Wharf Road was sold to build North Greenwich Station.

As the photograph shows, the railway cut across Wharf Road and a subway was built to allow people access.

So the question is, what happened to Wharf Road ? in 1937 it was renamed Saunders Ness Road which it remains today. As time moved on, Wharf Road has been forgotten but it is amazing that an old photograph can remind us of these little piece of Island History.

A walk down Saunders Ness Road today shows very little has survived of the past, the George Green School occupies much of the site near Island Gardens.

St John’s Church was consecrated in 1872 was designed by (Sir) A. W. Blomfield. The church was one of most active of the Island parishes where attendances at the church exceeded those at Christ Church and St Luke’s in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. It was estimated that the annual attendance figures for St John’s had reached 6,000. Unfortunately the church was a victim of the extensive bombing in the area in 1941 and became abandoned. Other churches on the Island lost the vast majority of its worshippers during the war and the three Island parishes were merged in 1952.

The postcard appears to be from someone associated with the church in 1904. Once again many thanks to Eric for providing such interesting information about the Island’s history.