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Monthly Archives: August 2017

A Snapshot of Notting Hill Carnival by L Katiyo

Photo by L. Katiyo

Bank Holiday Monday was the main day of the Notting Hill Carnival and regular contributor, L Katiyo made the journey west to report on the festivities.

Photo by L. Katiyo

However, even before she left Canary Wharf station, there was evidence that it was carnival time.

Photo by L. Katiyo

The Notting Hill Carnival regularly attracts over one million people over the two days and this year was the 51st carnival.

Photo by L. Katiyo

Thousands of performers with wonderful colourful costumes entertaining the large crowds lining the  streets in west London.

Photo by L. Katiyo

The warm and sunny day contributed to a relaxed and happy atmosphere although the carnival did pay tribute to the victims and survivors of the recent Grenfell Tower fire.

Photo by L. Katiyo

Many thanks to L Katiyo for the photographs.

Photo by L. Katiyo

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History of the Thames River Postman in the Pool of London 1800 to 1952 by Clifford. L. Evans – Part Two

The second part of the history looks at the beginning of the Evans family dynasty that would deliver the post on the river for the next 150 years.

Samuel Evans was apprentice to William Simpson, and after the Simpson court cases, Samuel Evans succeeded as the next River Postman and served from 1810 until 1832, thus beginning the dynasty passed down from father to son for nearly 150 years.

Samuel Lowden Evans youngest son of Samuel Evans received his indentures on 6th August 1812 and served until 1845. (pictured below)

Samuel Evans eldest son of Samuel Lowden Evans received his indentures 10th May 1832 and served from 1845 until 1856. (pictured below)

George Thomas Evans (pictured Below), brother of Samuel Evans and second son of Samuel Lowden Evans was sworn in to service on 23rd April 1845. (Breaking the tradition of father to son). He served for 29 years taking over from his brother Samuel Evans in 1856. He retired on 23rd April 1885, with a pension of £78 a year.

Below is a picture of the 3 generations Evans’s all would be serving River Postmen.

(H.L.Evans bottom middle, G.T.Evans middle row, and G.H.Evans top right)

George Thomas Evans was made a Special Constable within the Metropolitan Police District for the preservation of the public peace during the uprisings, for the period of 3 calendar months from 24th December1867. (pictured below)

George Henry Evans seen in this picture at the far left hand side sitting on the stool.He succeeded his father as a River Postman in 1885.

In this picture of G.H.Evans you may notice he is wearing a Straw Boater.

George Henry Evans’s boat was called “Jessie” named after his mother. It was a tradition of the Evans family to name their boats after their mothers.

Herbert Lionel Evans son of G H Evans received his indentures on 11th August 1908 and succeeded his father when he retired. (pictured below)

H. Evans was awarded the “Imperial Service Medal” for 29 years service as the River Postman on the 18th September 1914. (pictured below)

G.H.Evans’ Imperial Service Medal letter.

We have now covered over 100 years of the Evans dynasty which was remarkable considering the often dangerous aspect of the job. The Thames was full of ships, barges and other vessels and accidents were common, a small rowing boat offered little protection against the various dangers.

Many thanks to Clifford Evans for sharing his family history.

Viva Cuba in Canary Wharf

Photo by L Katiyo

It might surprise some people but Canary Wharf over the summer is full of events and live performances, these can range from Funk & Soul Nights to A Summer Evening with the London Philharmonic Orchestra.

Photo by L Katiyo

Regular contributor L Katiyo got in the party mood by attending the Viva Cuba night which took spectators on a journey through the music and dance of Cuban culture. 

Photo by L Katiyo

Viva Cuba showcased Cuban passion and humour when a cast of performers including 10 dancers performed dances of different rhythms with spectacular costumes from Havana’s famous Tropicana Club’s cabaret style, Son, Mambo, Cha Cha Cha, Salsa, Rumba and Bolero to more modern rhythms directly from the streets of Havana as Reggaeton.

Photo by L Katiyo

Viva Cuba featured a live band comprising some of the best Cuban musicians based in the UK.

Photo by L Katiyo

Our contributor was impressed with the show and she considered it outstanding, one of the best since the summer festival started. 

On Board the Brazilian Navy Tall Ship Cisne Branco in West India Dock

After yesterday’s arrival of the Cisne Branco of the Brazilian Navy, this morning I decided to have a closer look at the tall ship. Whilst taking a few pictures, I was invited to step on board and have a look around.

Although smaller than the recent visitor to the dock BAP Union, the Cisne Branco is much sleeker which reflected the ships design that was inspired by 19th century clippers.

There is something very nostalgic about these tall ships even if they have built recently, the Cisne Branco which means “white swan.” was built in the Daman shipyard in Amsterdam and was launched in 1999, the ship was commissioned as a Brazilian naval vessel in 2000.

Like many of these naval tall ships, the Cisne Branco is used to promote Brazilian Navy and Brazilian culture and the crew is made up of permanent crew and cadets of the Brazilian Naval School, Academy of Merchant Marine, and other naval schools.

Talking to some of the crew, the ship left Brazil in April and is due to return to its base in Rio in October.

The good news is that the ship will open to the public from 1pm today and open everyday till the ship departs on Saturday.

So if you would like to visit  a working tall ship, take this opportunity to have a look around.

Brazilian Navy Tall Ship Cisne Branco in West India Dock

After the recent visit of the Peruvian tall ship BAP Union,  we welcome another South American tall ship with the arrival of the Cisne Branco of the Brazilian Navy.

Cisne Branco which means “white swan.” was built in the Daman shipyard in Amsterdam and was launched in 1999, the ship was commissioned as a Brazilian naval vessel in 2000.

Cisne Branco made her maiden voyage across the Atlantic Ocean to Brazil, celebrating the 500th anniversary of the discovery of Brazil. The ship’s design was inspired by 19th century clippers and is sleek and fast like many of its predecessors.

Like many of these naval tall ships, the Cisne Branco is used to promote Brazilian Navy and Brazilian culture but has a functional use in training the cadets of the Brazilian Naval School, Academy of Merchant Marine, and other naval schools. She also takes part in tall ship races and regatta around the world.

The ship is 74 m (243 ft) long, has a beam of 10 m (33 ft), height of 46 m (151 ft) and carries a crew of around 140.

Many of these ships tend to be open to the public when they are in dock, however the details are not known at this time.

History of the Thames River Postman in the Pool of London 1800 to 1952 by Clifford. L. Evans – Part One

Some time ago, I wrote an article about the story of Thames River Postmen and especially about the Evans family who over generations delivered the post in the Pool of London. I was delighted to be contacted by Clifford. L. Evans who is the youngest grandson of Herbert Lionel Evans who held the title of Thames River Postman until the 1950s. Clifford has researched his distinguished family of river postman and has agreed to share his findings with Isle of Dogs Life.

Over the next few weeks, I will publish Cliff’s fascinating research into one of the most unusual postman’s rounds in London. We begin with the first River Postmen whose tenure was marred by tragedy and crime.

John Plumridge put the idea of the River Postman to the General Post Office in 1793, however at that time the proposal was turned down. The matter was raised again in 1799, and for a 3-month trial period the service began on the 10th February 1800. Due to its success the Thames River Post was born!

William Simpson became the first River Postman of the Pool of London. He was reported to have delivered and received over 26,864 letters in his first year of service. In 1806 tragedy struck, and, whilst on duty he fell into a scuttle accidentally left open on board the ship “The Good Intent”, and died as a result of his injuries.

His son also called William, who had been his fathers’ assistant, took over from him at the age of 16, and it is reported that he was his fathers’ second apprentice, the first having drowned 3 years earlier.

Whilst serving as a River Postman Simpson Jnr, stole various letters and £20 from a merchant in Whitechapel, London. This crime was a capital offence, and carried the Death penalty. He went into hiding and a Warrant poster (picture below) was circulated with a reward of £100 from the Postmaster General Francis Freeling.

He was captured at “The Swan” public house, Forest Row, East Grinstead, East Sussex, and spent his time before the trial in custody at the Newgate Prison in London. He was tried at the Old Bailey on 21st October 1810, where he was found guilty of this felony, and was condemned to the gallows. The Jury recommended that due to his age, the death sentence should be reduced. The Crown amended the sentence, and after serving 6 months in Prison he was transported to a life overseas. His name appears on the list of convicts onboard the ship “The Guilford”, which sailed from England bound for New South Wales Australia.

Newgate Prison in London

Samuel Evans was apprentice to William Simpson, and during the search and court cases Samuel Evans succeeded as the next River Postman and served from 1810 until 1832, thus beginning the dynasty passed down from father to son for nearly 150 years.

The next part will feature the beginning of the Evans family dynasty that would deliver the post on the river for the next 150 years

 

Late Bloom Arts Festival in Canary Wharf – 10th to 13th August 2017

Over the Summer months, the public spaces around Canary Wharf come to life with a large number of events. One event that provides a platform for local artists is the Late Bloom Arts Festival which returns to the Crossrail Place Roof Garden performance space.

The festival is a weekend of family fun and performances by artists featuring theatre, dance, music and spoken word.

All the family-friendly performances are free to attend.

Programme

10th August

7pm – Sunday Jazz Assembly: Enjoy toe tapping tunes from crowd pleasers like Girl from Ipanema and Why Don’t You Do Right to forgotten classics like Cherokee

11th August

6.30pm – Band for Life: Come experience music therapy with Band for Life, an innovative project based on the therapeutic effects of music run by Tower Hamlets Methodist circuit

7.30pm – Urban Interface Dance: Hip-hop and theatre combined through Urban Interface Dance

7.40pm – Jessica Mance & Samantha Flemming: Of Seagulls and Men – A vibrant and tongue-in-cheek parody of Homer’s Iliad in which the men battle a family of seagulls for control of a seaside town

8pm – Swati Seshdarig: Bharathanatyam, classical South Indian dance – The performance takes the audience on a resplendent journey through the wonders of Indian culture

12th August

1.45pm – Piedad Seiquer: Ellas, a solo dance performance, is a work in progress investigating the figure of a woman. It’s not only the story of one woman but many women

2pm – Blooming Ludus: Salt & Vinegar DIY Summer Extravaganza – Light-hearted and just a bit cheeky, the song repertoire of Salt & Vinegar follows these fun-loving fish as they attempt to navigate the changing world around them

2.30pm – Jessica Mance & Samantha Flemming: Of Seagulls and Men – A vibrant and tongue-in-cheek parody of Homer’s Iliad in which the men battle a family of seagulls for control of a seaside town

3pm – Tango E14: Performance and workshop

4pm – Piedad Seiquer: Ellas, a solo dance performance, is a work in progress investigating the figure of a woman. It’s not only the story of one woman but many women

5pm – Un:Hurd: Live musical showcase involving local artists from East and Central London, each performing 4 of their own original tracks

13th August

10am – And So My Garden Grows: A family workshop – Cast your eye on the strawberry trees, ferns and other plants brought on ships to London’s Docklands from faraway lands then, create your own mini garden with real seeds that will sprout and grow

12.30pm – Nylah: I use my songs to move and inspire people with words and melodies that are uplifting. I make positive music for people to enjoy and relate to

1.15pm – Genio: People are people; a song about being one among all. We all are together in our world, no matter colours and creed etc

1.45pm – Piedad Seiquer: Ellas, a solo dance performance, is a work in progress investigating the figure of a woman. It’s not only the story of one woman but many women

2.15pm – RedBeard: Human beatboxer with more than five years professional performance experience

3pm – Grace Mason: Grace will be performing a range of songs

4pm – Piedad Seiquer: Ellas, a solo dance performance, is a work in progress investigating the figure of a woman. It’s not only the story of one woman but many women.

Other events to  look out for are a fun packed photography workshop on the 11th August and the Canary Wharf Jazz Festival on the 19th and 20th August 2017