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Monthly Archives: June 2019

Visiting the Mudchute Agricultural Show 2019 – 30th June

Summer has finally arrived and it is time to enjoy some of the outside delights of the Island. On a sleepy Sunday morning, I made my way to Mudchute Park & Farm for the Mudchute Agricultural Show 2019.

The show takes place over the weekend and allows city dwellers to enjoy some of the delights of country life.

Rare breed sheep from London’s City Farms are shown in livestock shows,

with categories such as best young handlers, primitive sheep and best lambs.

Craft creators, wood workers and dry stone wall makers are demonstrating  their crafts

and local market stall holders are selling their creations.

Visitors are treated to a large number of attractions and can enjoy a stroll around the Park & Farm . The Mudchute Agricultural Show is fast becoming one of the main highlights of the Island events year.

Mudchute Park & Farm is one of the largest inner City Farms in Europe with a wonderful collection of British rare breeds and currently home to over 100 animals and fowl. Set in 32 acres of countryside in the heart of East London, Mudchute is a community charity, with a working farm, stables and a wide range of education activities.

Mudchute Agricultural Show 2019 takes place on Saturday 29th and Sunday 30th of June between 11am – 4pm

Lower Field, Mudchute Park and Farm, Isle of Dogs ,London E14 3HP

Entry is Free

For more information, visit the Mudchute Park and Farm website here

Farewell to the Mexican Tall Ship Cuauhtémoc

Photo by Eric Pemberton

After a few days in West India Dock,  the ARM Cuauhtémoc tall ship left the dock to continue her travels around the world. Fortunately one of our regular contributors, Eric Pemberton was on hand to record the ship leaving the dock.

Photo by Eric Pemberton

The ARM Cuauhtémoc  is a sail training tall ship that is part of the Mexican Navy, She is one of four sister ships that were built by the Naval Shipyards of Bilbao in 1982 to a 1930s design similar to the famous German Tall ship Gorch Fock.

Photo by Eric Pemberton

The Cuauhtémoc is a sailing ambassador for her home country and is a frequent visitor to many of world ports, having sailed over 400,000 nautical miles (700,000 km) in her 23 years of service. She has also appeared in a number of Tall Ships races all over the world.

One of the joys of living on the Isle of Dogs is to see some wonderful ships going into the dock and up and down the river.

Tall Ship Tenacious in West India Dock

After a very quiet period we seem to have had a flurry excitement in West India Dock with the arrival of the HMS Enterprise, a Mexican tall ship and now a regular visitor,  the STS Tenacious has berthed in the dock.

The Tenacious is a wooden sail training ship which was specially designed to be able to accommodate disabled sailors. Launched in Southampton in the year 2000, it is one of the largest wooden tall ships in the world. It is 65 metres long with a beam of 10.6 metres at its widest point.

The Tenacious and the Lord Nelson  are owned by the UK-based charity the Jubilee Sailing Trust who have for many years have pioneered sailing for the disabled. The Jubilee Sailing Trust became a registered charity in 1978 and was the brainchild of Christopher Rudd, a school teacher and sailor who wanted to give the disabled children he taught the same experiences his able-bodied students had.

Since its launch Tenacious has taken nearly 12,000 people sailing of these 3,000 were physically disabled and 1,000 were wheelchair users.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mexican Tall Ship Cuauhtémoc in West India Dock

The West India Dock is quite full today with the HMS Enterprise  and the ARM Cuauhtémoc which is a sail training tall ship that is part of the Mexican Navy.

She is one of four sister ships that were built by the Naval Shipyards of Bilbao in 1982 to a 1930s design similar to the famous German Tall ship Gorch Fock.

The Cuauhtémoc is a sailing ambassador for her home country and is a frequent visitor to many of world ports, having sailed over 400,000 nautical miles (700,000 km) in her 23 years of service. She has also appeared in a number of Tall Ships races all over the world.

The ship has around 186 officer and crew and 90 trainees.

At this time, it is not known if she will be open to the public, last time when she visited West India Dock in 2016, she was open for a number of days.

 

 

 

 

HMS Enterprise in West India Dock

It has been very quiet in West India Dock recently but today we welcome the HMS Enterprise which is one of the Royal Navy’s most advanced survey vessels and also acts as a floating base for mine countermeasures activities.

The ship is 90.6 m (297 ft 3 in) long, has a beam of 16.8 m (55 ft 1 in) and draught of 5.5 m (18 ft 1 in).

HMS Enterprise is the tenth ship to bear this name in the Royal Navy and is a multi-role survey vessel, she has a sister ship, HMS Echo, and together they make up the Echo class of survey vessels.

HMS Enterprise was built by Appledore Shipbuilders and was launched in 2002, and commissioned in 2003.

Photograph from Eric Pemberton

Enterprise’s crew consists of 72 personnel, with 48 on board at any one time. The ship is operationally available 330 days a year.

Photograph – Eric Pemberton

Over the past five years, she’s been involved in a range of activities, from detecting mines in the Arabian Gulf to surveying hundreds of thousands of square miles of ocean floor.

The good news is that the ship is open to visitors on Saturday 22nd 2019, to have a visit you must get a ticket from the Eventbrite website.

Many thanks for the photographs from Eric Pemberton of the ship coming into the dock

For more information about tickets, visit the Eventbrite site here

 

The Mudchute Agricultural Show 2019 – 29th and 30th June

Get away from the urban jungle and get a taste of the countryside with the Mudchute Agricultural Show 2019. The show takes place over two days and allows city dwellers to enjoy some of the delights of country life.

Mudchute will welcome rare breed sheep from London’s City Farms and beyond for two days of livestock shows, with categories such as best young handlers, primitive sheep and best lambs.

Test your baking and culinary skills by entering the fresh produce competitions which will take place on Saturday with cakes and bakes as well as jams, chutneys and more. For those whose passion is growing, the hanging baskets and vegetable box competitions are not to be missed. Community participation is encouraged and free registrations are open from 10am on the day.

Fleece spinners, wood workers and willow weavers will demonstrate their crafts and local market stall holders will sell their creations. There will be a Shetland pony photo booth and raffle with proceeds going directly towards the upkeep of the Mudchute Park & Farm.

Visitors are encouraged to bring their own picnic or enjoy a meal at Mudchute Café, Ruby Red tea caddy or the food truck.

MasterChef semi-finalist Annie McKenzie and team will close the day bringing food and theatre together in a production of The Wind in the Willows, an immersive dining experience like no other (book tickets ahead).

Mudchute Park & Farm is one of the largest inner City Farms in Europe with a wonderful collection of British rare breeds and currently home to over 100 animals and fowl. Set in 32 acres of countryside in the heart of East London, Mudchute is a community charity, with a working farm, stables and a wide range of education activities.

Mudchute Agricultural Show 2019 takes place on Saturday 29th and Sunday 30th of June between 11am – 4pm

Lower Field, Mudchute Park and Farm, Isle of Dogs ,London E14 3HP

Entry is Free

For more information, visit the Mudchute Park and Farm website here

The Changing Face of Canary Wharf – June 2019

Each year, I try to keep readers up to date with some of the latest building developments on the Island and Canary Wharf.  It has been a time when the various developments have progressed quickly and the new Canary Wharf skyline is beginning to take shape.

Whilst there are some major developments on the Island, most of the larger developments are around Millwall Dock, Marsh Wall and especially overlooking the South Dock around South Quay and the developments in Canary Wharf are taking place in the east and west fringes of the estate. Two major schemes are under development, Wood Wharf and the Newfoundland development.

Both developments have made considerable progress with the buildings steadily moving upwards, the Wood Wharf site in particular is taking shape with its distinct residential tower climbing higher  and other buildings in various states of development.

When completed the Wood Wharf site will have a mix of uses, including a residential area for over 3,200 new homes, nearly 2 million sq ft of commercial office space, and 335,000 sq ft of shops, restaurants and community uses.

At the other side of the Island, the 58-storey residential tower on the Newfoundland site is now well into construction with glass facades nearly completed.

If you think this will be tall, it will be dwarfed by the new development over the road from the Newfoundland site, it is based on the old City Arms site and is called the Landmark Pinnacle which will have 75 levels which the developers claim will be London’s largest residential tower. This will eventually be part of the Landmark complex which is situated near the site.

Along Marsh Wall are the beginnings of the Wardian towers, there will be two blocks at South Quay Plaza, Galliard are building more towers which will be part of Millharbour Village and finally there is the Madison scheme is progressing well.

It is remarkable that except for complaining about the various road and path closures and the disruption of lorries delivering materials, most people take very little notice of the various developments until they are completed.

It is worth noting that this is one of the biggest developments in the United Kingdom since Canary Wharf was built. Because most of the development has been concentrated at the top of the Island, there has not been widespread criticism, although many questions are being asked about coping with the increased population and the increase in workers coming into Canary Wharf to work.  In the next few years, it is expected the population of the Isle of Dogs will be double that of 2011. The delay to Crossrail is not likely to impact too much due to the buildings state of development in not anywhere near completion.

The history of the Isle of Dogs has been about change, however in the next decade; the whole skyline of the Isle of Dogs will change dramatically. It is part of the process that started with the building of Canary Wharf skyscrapers that seemed to change London’s attitude to tall buildings forever.