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The Changing Face of Trinity Buoy Wharf

Nobody can fail to be aware of the major developments in Canary Wharf and the Isle of Dogs but a recent visit to Trinity Buoy Wharf suggests that change is even coming to one of the more isolated parts of the area.

Orchard Place has been transformed by the City Island development and gradually the building works are moving near to Trinity Buoy Wharf with the Goodluck Hope development which will provide 804 new homes, commercial units, an education space, and a restored Grade II-listed Orchard Dry Dock.

The impression of isolation that has been a major characteristic of Trinity Buoy Wharf for centuries is gradually disappearing as lorries trundle up Orchard Place.

Keen to pay homage to its history, the name of some of the old firms are now displayed in the buildings and information boards give an interesting history lesson.

The area has a fascinating history, For nearly two centuries the Corporation of Trinity House occupied this site from 1803 to 1988, but even before then in 1760s Trinity House were storing buoys in nearby Blackwall. The site was mainly used for storing buoys and other marine equipment but gradually workshops were added for testing, repairing and making equipment.

The Lighthouse was not built to aid the Thames river traffic but was an Experimental Lighthouse which was designed by James Douglass, the one still standing was not the first one however there was another experimental lantern nearby built in the 1850s in which the famous scientist Michael Faraday carried out tests in electric lighting for lighthouses.

The present lighthouse was constructed in 1864 and was used to experiment with electric light and different coloured lights the results being checked at Charlton across the river. After the second world war the lighthouse was used for the training of Lighthouse keepers.

Outside the warehouse in memory of the work of Michael Faraday is a small shed called the Faraday Effect.

Lined up against the jetty is an old Trinity lighthouse ship which has been turned into a Music Recording Studio.

Old shipping containers have been painted and made into office blocks called Container City .

Fatboy’s Diner, a genuine 1940s American Diner from New Jersey has now been moved in front of the lighthouse.

For the last twenty years, Trinity Buoy Wharf has been developed into an Arts Quarter and a film by Rupert Murray here tells the story of how the location is now a workplace to over 500 people who often work in the creative industries. There are new proposals that includes the development of new buildings to provide additional floorspace, a new riverside walkway and public square.

As usual, I will try to keep up with new developments and chart some of the changes that will transform Trinity Buoy Wharf in the next few years.

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Orchard Place : From London’s ‘lost village’ to Mini Manhattan – Update 

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Whilst I have been watching the developments around Canary Wharf and the Isle of Dogs with some interest, there is another development at Orchard Place which is beginning to take shape. In a post in 2014, I reported that a new bridge had been built across from Orchard Place to Canning Town station. Since then buildings have appeared on the City Island site and ‘Mini Manhattan’ is becoming a reality. 

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Residential living has not taken place on this small piece of ground since the 1930s when it was the location of a small population of around 300 people for over a century.

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Because of its location, it is effectively cut off by water, surrounded by Bow Creek and the Thames with just a narrow path going to Leamouth Road and the small settlement of people in Orchard Place felt they were cut off from the Isle of Dogs and Poplar.

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 In the 1930s an old resident explained “From its start to the present, we have never had either a butcher, baker, barber, post office, police Station, fire Station or pawn Shop, or seen a tramway or bus in our neighbourhood, so we have to do all our domestic business in Poplar, via Leamouth Road, which is a long and lonely walk, especially by night.”

Many people in Poplar and the Isle of Dogs did not even know Orchard Place existed and those that did probably heard stories about the resident’s lawlessness and rough lifestyle.

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Many of the residents in Orchard Place  were related and worked in the various factories and shipyards, however the Thames Plate Glass Works was a major employer in the 19th century when it was estimated that 75% of the Orchard Place adult residents worked there.

At its height of popularity, Orchard Place had around 100 two-storied cottages but by the 1930s that had been reduced to around 50. The cottages were never that strongly built and were prone to flooding in the lower rooms. However it was the great flood of 1928 which devastated the dwellings and even though people still lived in them into the 1930s, newspaper reports of the time reported on the scandal of the living conditions and labelled the area “London’s Lost village.”

Eventually the residents were rehoused in nearby Oban House in Poplar and the houses demolished and land used for various industrial use.

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Considering its history, it is with some irony that the City Island has been built to foster a ‘community feel’ with gardens and leisure facilities. The old Orchard Place residents had a very strong community but few facilities.

Despite the development of Trinity Buoy Wharf as an Art Quarter, this particular area still feels strangely distant from the main areas of Poplar, Canary Wharf and the Isle of Dogs. It remains to be seen whether the land which was the location of  “London’s Lost village” will finally be popular with a new generation of residents.

A Walk around Trinity Buoy Wharf

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Regular readers will know that I am fascinated by the Trinity Buoy Wharf area which is one of the most unusual places in London. The bright sunshine on Sunday was just the encouragement I needed to take a walk up to the wharf to check up on the latest developments. With plenty of street art and sculptures around the site, there is always something new to discover.

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For the those who do not know the area, here is a short potted history. The Corporation of Trinity House is a company responsible for buoys, lighthouses and lightships and in the early 19th century established Trinity Buoy Wharf as its Thames-side workshop where wooden buoys and sea marks were made and stored. Eventually new buildings were constructed during the Victorian period including the Electrician’s Building and an Experimental Lighthouse whose roof space housed a workshop for the famous scientist Michael Faraday.

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By 1910 Trinity Buoy Wharf was a major local employer, with over 150 workers on the site and carried on until 1988 when it finally closed. In 1998, Trinity Buoy Wharf which was then an empty, derelict site was taken over by The Trinity Buoy Wharf Trust which began to develop the area as a centre for the arts and creative industries and the location is now home to a working community of over 350 people.

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The first indication that this is a slightly surreal location is the Black London taxi with a tree sprouting out of the top mounted on a roundabout. A number of large buoys and some street art entertain you as you walk along the pathway up to wharf. One of the most striking pieces of work is the Electric Soup mural by New Zealand Artist Bruce Mahalski on a former shop front on Orchard Place.

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A new piece is a 3D painting of the word paint which is quite striking as you wander down the road.

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Sculptor Andrew Baldwin has a number of sculptures at the wharf including his latest installation which is a very original staircase has been installed on the Main Stores building.

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If the sculpture was a surprise, the fact that the Fat Boy’s Diner has been moved next to the Lighthouse was more of a shock. Fatboy’s Diner is a genuine 1940s American Diner from New Jersey that was bought over from the States then had a few short stays in different parts of London before finding its present site. The Diner itself is a bit of a celebrity featuring in the film Sliding Doors, music videos and magazines.

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The growth of the Container City seems to be ongoing with new studio and gallery space being developed. It was encouraging to see more people than normal coming to the wharf on a Sunday with a steady stream of people enjoying the area and the food and drink at the Cafe and the diner.

 

Inside London’s Lighthouse at Trinity Buoy Wharf – September 2015

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A couple of weekends ago, thinking it was time to catch up with developments at Trinity Bouy Wharf and despite the threatening grey clouds, I set forth to one of the most unusual corners of London. Walking along Orchard Place is a rather surreal experience with old buoys and a Taxi with a tree sticking out of the top. Street Art and Information boards add to the strange mixture of old and new.

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Photo Eric Pemberton

Reaching Trinity Bouy Wharf and noticing the door to the Lighthouse was open, I thought it was time to explore inside London’s Lighthouse.

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Inside the Lighthouse is the Longplayer installation, which has been running since the 31st December 1999,In addition to the listening post, there are 234 singing bowls, used as a part of the 66-foot-wide orchestral instrument to perform Longplayer Live, are on display. The steel structure, designed by Ingrid Hu, was commissioned to display and store the bowls and was installed in autumn 2012. Each tier of the structure, containing 39 bowls positioned sequentially, corresponds to one of the six concentric rings of the Longplayer Live instrument.

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The Lighthouse has an interesting history, in 1864–6, a new chain and buoy store was built whose main feature was an experimental lighthouse tower incorporated into the east wall. This was not the first experimental lantern on the site, in the 1850s a lantern in one of the older storehouses was used for the electric lighting trials carried out under the direction of famous scientist Michael Faraday. In the new Lighthouse, Faraday asked for a ‘chamber’ with a rigid iron floor for examining optical apparatus which was provided.

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The brick lighthouse tower is 36ft up to the gallery and 57ft to the top of the lantern.  The lanterns were used in 1869 for trials of electric lighting from the eastern side, and the results observed from across the river in Charlton.

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After the Second World War, the tower was used in the training of lighthouse keepers. A newspaper report from 1948 shows cadets being trained in all aspects of Lighthouse keeping.

TRAINING CADETS AS LIGHTHOUSE MEN

Despite the arduous duties and the loneliness of the life, lighthouse keeping is popular as a career in Britain, and there is no shortage of applicants. To join the lighthouse service a man must be British, between the ages of 19 and 28 years, must have completed his military service and must be single—he can marry after four years’ service, or when promoted to assistant keeper. Cadets receive their initial training at the Trinity House school for lighthouse men at Blackwall, London, where the following pictures were taken. The remainder of the training period is spent at light stations.

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The Lighthouse was a site for Trinity House to test their Lighting equipment and train keepers to carry out the duties if they were looking after the  various types of Light stations, The training included cleaning the glass of the lantern to refuelling the Light, maintaining the machinery and sounding a range of different types of fog signal.

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A trip to Trinity Buoy Wharf is always worthwhile, but if you would like to look around the Lighthouse it is only open at weekends. Admission is free.

Opening Hours: Open every weekend, 11am – 5pm (winter times, October – March inclusive, 11am – 4pm).

 

Memories of Bow Creek between the Wars

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Orchard Place – 1924 (Photo W Whiffin)

For the last few weeks I have featured the memories of Lorraine Harrington about life in the 1930s on the Island. Her memories bought home the realisation that the thirties were hard for many people with economic decline, unemployment and the prospect of war.

Last week, another set of memories were bought to my attention which clearly illustrate some of these problems.

The memories have been published in a blog dedicated to the life of Lucy Matilda Taylor and called   ‘ Down the Wall – An East End Childhood between the Wars by Samantha French’.

Samantha French is Lucy’s daughter and did something most of us wish we had done but often never get around to, she decided to write about her mother’s life. Samantha had  moved to Australia around 40 years ago, however on one of her visits home 20 years later decided to collect the memories of her mother. For many evenings they would sit down, have a couple of drinks and Samantha would turn on the tape recorder and Lucy would chat away.

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Samantha French with Mum (Lucy) and Doreen  hopping at Yalding in Kent in later years.

Eventually Samantha produced a hard copy of her mother’s memories and gave them to Lucy’s other children and to Lucy herself.

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Bow Creek – AG Linney 1933 (Photo Museum of London)

Regular readers will know that I have written many articles about Orchard Place and Bow Creek and especially about the small community that lived there up to the 1930s. The Bow Creek community were a mystery even to people  who lived in nearby Poplar.

Very little was written about the community, therefore  the memories of Lucy are fascinating on many levels. Although the community shared many of the problems and pastimes of other East End folk, there were aspects of the community that were unique.

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Bow Creek – AG Linney 1934 (Photo Museum of London)

For example they often made a living from the river either by collecting some of flotsam and jetsam or fishing. A number of the community who no doubt had for years watched the boats going by, succumbed to the lure of the  sea and joined the Merchant Navy.

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Bow Creek Flood Damage 1928

The community may have benefitted from the river at times, but it was also a source of destruction. High tides often flooded the small houses and the Great Thames Flood of 1928 caused considerable damage which the community never really recovered from.

If you would like to read Lucy’s memories, you will find a link to the site here.

Down the Wall – An East End Childhood between the Wars by Samantha French

Many thanks to a member of the family , Michael Bennett who developed the blog and provided further information.

 

 

Orchard Place : From London’s ‘lost village’ to Mini Manhattan

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In a previous post I was speculating about the development at Orchard Place which now has  a bridge across to Canning Town station, the plans for the development have now been published and the City Island site has been dubbed ‘ Mini Manhattan.’

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Although this piece of land has been not used for residential living since the 1930s, before then it was the location of a small population of around 300 people for over a century. Because of its location it is effectively cut off by water, surrounded by Bow Creek and the Thames with just a narrow path going to Leamouth Road.

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For the small settlement of people in Orchard Place they felt they were  cut off from the Isle of Dogs. In the 1930s an old resident explained “From its start to the present, we have never had either a butcher, baker, barber, post office, Police Station, Fire Station or Pawn Shop, or seen a tramway or bus in our neighbourhood, so we have to do all our domestic business in Poplar, via Leamouth Road, which is a long and lonely walk, especially by night.”
Many people in Poplar and the Isle of Dogs did not even know Orchard Place existed and those that did probably heard stories about the residents lawlessness and rough lifestyle.

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Many of the residents were related and worked in the various factories and shipyards, however the Thames Plate Glass Works was a major employer in the 19th century when it was estimated that 75% of the Orchard Place adult residents worked there.

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Thames Glass plate works covered much of the northern part of Orchard Place (fig 1866)

At its height of popularity, Orchard Place had around 100 two storied cottages but by the 1930s that had been reduced to around 50. The cottages were never that strongly built and were prone to flooding in the lower rooms. However it was the great flood of 1928 which devastated the dwellings and even though people still lived in them into the 1930s, newspaper reports of the time reported on the scandal of the living conditions and labelled the area “London’s Lost village.”
Eventually the residents were rehoused in nearby Oban House in Poplar and the houses demolished and land used for various industrial use.

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And that is the way it has been until a few years ago, when the land was cleared for development, various schemes were suggested but it seems the City Island development is now in the process of being started.

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Reading about the development, there is no clear idea of how many people will live there, but they do stress that Orchard Place or  City Island as it will be known will have a ‘community feel’ to it with gardens and leisure facilities.

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If the development goes ahead as planned it will be a remarkable transformation for a small piece of land that was considered London’s lost village , cut off from the nearby Isle of Dogs and Poplar but now in the City Island brochure, the main selling point  is how well-connected it is !

London’s Lighthouse – The Mysterious World of Trinity Buoy Wharf

There are few stranger places in London than Trinity Buoy Wharf, still a part of the Isle of Dogs it gives the impression of isolation but is only a couple of miles away from Canary Wharf or Canning Town.

It’s location at the eastern tip of Orchard Place is reached by walking up a road flanked by Industrial units.

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The walk gives no indication of what you will find at your destination except for the odd buoy,although the information boards dotted along the road give an interesting history lesson.

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Although there are a few oddities along the way.

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When you arrive at the Wharf, surprises come thick and fast where  nothing is quite what it seems to be.

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The first surprise is there is a Lighthouse, and it turns out that both the Lighthouse and Wharf have quite an history.

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For nearly two centuries  the Corporation of Trinity House occupied this site from 1803 to 1988, but even before then in 1760s Trinity House were storing  buoys in nearby Blackwall.

The site was mainly used for storing buoys and other marine equipment but gradually workshops were added for testing, repairing and making equipment.

The Lighthouse was not built to aid the Thames river traffic but was an Experimental Lighthouse which was designed by James Douglass, the one still standing was not the first one however there was another experimental lantern nearby built in the 1850s in which the famous scientist Michael Faraday carried out tests in electric lighting for lighthouses.

The present lighthouse was constructed in 1864 and was used to experiment with electric light and different coloured lights the results being checked at Charlton across the river. After the second world war the lighthouse was used for the training of Lighthouse keepers.

The workshops were greatly altered over time until they were finally closed in 1988

There are no lighthouses keepers but there is plenty of noise  because  the lighthouse now houses a sound installation called Longplayer  that will not stop until 2999 .

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Outside the warehouse in memory of the work of Michael Faraday is a small shed called the Faraday Effect.

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Lined up against the jetty is an old Trinity lighthouse ship which has been turned into a Music Recording Studio.

The old workshops no longer have the clang of metal on metal but the dancing feet of various dance groups or the raised voices of a Theatre or Opera company.

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Old shipping containers have been painted and made into  office blocks called Container City .

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But perhaps the last thing you would expect to find in such a place is the Fatboy’s Diner, a genuine 1940s American Diner from New Jersey that was bought over from the States then had  a few short stays in different parts of London before finding its present site. The Diner itself is a bit of a celebrity featuring in the film Sliding Doors, music videos and magazines.

The concentration of Arts and Culture facilities is part of the legacy handed to Urban Space management to develop an Arts Quarter. This has yet to fully developed but if you want a great view of the Thames and the O2 whilst drinking a milkshake at an original American Diner opposite a lighthouse this is the place for you.

Other posts you may find interesting

London’s Lost Village – The Story of Orchard Place